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Uterus Transplantation Clinical Trial

  • First in the United States: Two Babies Born to Mothers Who Received Transplanted Uteri

    Two babies have been born at Baylor University Medical Center, part of Baylor Scott & White Health, to mothers who received a uterus. These live births are the latest medical milestones in the uterine transplant clinical trial at Baylor University Medical Center, being conducted through Baylor Scott & White Research Institute.

About the Trial

Uterus Transplantation provides a promising potential treatment for women with absolute uterine factor infertility (AUI). A woman with AUI cannot carry a pregnancy. She is either born without a uterus, had her uterus removed or has a nonfunctioning uterus.


In 2016, Baylor Scott & White Health affiliates Baylor University Medical Center and Baylor Scott & White Research Institute started a pioneering clinical trial to explore uterus transplantation with the goal of achieving a healthy pregnancy and live birth. Ten women received transplants, and in November 2017, the nation’s first baby was born to a woman who received a uterus transplant. Following this major milestone, a second baby was born to another recipient in the trial in March 2018.

Baylor Scott & White Research Institute and Baylor University Medical Center have now started a second phase of the uterus transplant clinical trial and will transplant another 10 women who experience AUI.

Recipient Eligibility

Please note eligibility and requirements have been updated since the first phase of this trial.

  • Women with uterine factor infertility
  • Ages 20-35, with working ovaries
  • BMI of less than 30
  • Cancer-free for at least five years
  • Negative for HIV, hepatitis B and C, chlamydia, gonorrhea and herpes
  • No history of diabetes
  • Non-smoker

Donor Requirements

  • Ages 30-50
  • BMI of less than 30
  • Cancer-free for last five years
  • Negative for HIV, hepatitis, gonorrhea, chlamydia and herpes
  • No history of hypertension or diabetes

A uterus can be donated from either a living or deceased donor. A living uterus donor has met any desire she has to do her own childbearing and gives her uterus for the purpose of transplantation to a female recipient. A deceased uterus donor is a female that is willing to donate her uterus after death. A uterus transplant or donation is not for everyone, and there is an extensive screening process prior to inclusion in the trial. If you are interested in uterus donation or to enroll for uterus transplant, please complete our online contact us form.

Patients interested in learning more about the process should visit BSWHealth.com/UterusTransplant.

Frequently Asked Questions

Yes, the first clinical trial of uterus transplant for women with uterine factor infertility started in Sweden in 2012. The trial resulted in nine uterus transplants and eight live births. The first baby was born in 2014. When Baylor University Medical Center and Baylor Scott & White Research Institute started its trial in 2016, pivotal team members from the Swedish team were included in the process. Baylor University Medical Center now has a multidisciplinary team of specialists, surgeons, nurses and staff who have helped achieve the first-in-the-nation milestone of a baby born to a woman in the hospital’s trial.

After a successful live birth, the recipient may have the option to keep the uterus for a second pregnancy. The physicians will consider the course of the first pregnancy and together with the mother, determine when and how to move forward safely toward a second pregnancy.

Uterus transplantation is not designed as a permanent organ donation. Because carrying foreign body tissue can increase infection risk and requires lifelong anti-rejection medication, women in this study will undergo a hysterectomy after one or two successful pregnancies.

Prior to the surgery, recipients will undergo in-vitro fertilization (IVF), which is possible because qualified patients must have healthy and otherwise normal-functioning ovaries. In-vitro fertilization uses reproductive technology to retrieve eggs from the ovaries and fertilize in the lab with sperm from the subject’s male partner. After surgery, the women will be monitored and may be eligible for an embryo produced from the earlier IVF procedures to be transferred as early as a year following the womb transplant. If implantation is successful and the recipient becomes pregnant, she will be routinely monitored until her baby is delivered by cesarean section.

Yes. The entire process of transplantation, fertilization, prenatal care and delivery are all connected as part of the clinical trial and will take place in Dallas.

Frequently Asked Questions

Has this been done before?

Yes, a similar trial in Sweden for women with uterine factor infertility resulted in seven womb transplants and five live births. In 2014, a 36-year-old Swedish trial participant became the first woman in the world to give birth to a baby via a donated uterus. The Swedish study took place after more than a decade of lab research that showed promising results for this procedure. The Baylor University Medical Center team will apply the insights of those outcomes to this study, with special input from the researchers involved in the initial effort at Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg, Sweden.


Can a recipient have more than one child with a donated uterus?

After a successful live birth, the recipient may have the option to keep the uterus for a second pregnancy. The physicians will consider the course of the first pregnancy and together with the mother, determine when and how to move forward safely towards a second pregnancy.


Does the donated uterus remain implanted in the recipient after the baby is born?

Uterine transplantation is not designed as a permanent organ donation. Because carrying foreign body tissue can increase infection risk and requires lifelong anti-rejection medication, women in this study will undergo a hysterectomy after one or two successful pregnancies.


What is the process?

Prior to the surgery, recipients will undergo in-vitro fertilization (IVF), which is possible because qualified patients must have healthy and otherwise normal functioning ovaries. In-vitro fertilization uses reproductive technology to retrieve eggs from the ovaries and fertilize in the lab with sperm from the subject’s male partner. After surgery, the women will be monitored and may be eligible for an embryo produced from the earlier IVF procedures to be transferred as early as a year following the womb transplant. If implantation is successful and the recipient becomes pregnant, she will be routinely monitored until her baby is delivered by cesarean section.


Do study participants have to be located in Dallas?

Yes. The entire process of transplantation, fertilization, prenatal care and delivery are all connected as part of this study and will take place at Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas.

Our Medical Team

Dr. Giuliano Testa

Giuliano Testa, MD

Transplant surgeon. Division Chief of Abdominal Transplant and Surgical Director of Living Donor Liver Transplantation at Baylor University Medical Center. Principal Investigator of the uterus transplant clinical trial.

Dr. Liza Johannesson

Liza Johannesson, MD, PhD

Gynecologic oncology surgeon. Medical Director of Uterus Transplant and Assistant Professor at Baylor University Medical Center. Member of the uterus transplant team in Sweden that welcomed the first baby in the world born after uterus transplantation.

Dr. Robert T. Gunby Jr.

Robert T. Gunby Jr., MD

Obstetrician. Medical Director of Labor and Delivery and Assistant Chief of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Baylor University Medical Center.

Dr. E. Colin Koon

E. Colin Koon, MD, PhD

Gynecologiconcology surgeon. Co-chair for robotic surgical services at Baylor University Medical Center.

Dr. Gregory J. McKenna

Gregory J. McKenna, MD

Transplant surgeon. Director of Liver Transplant Surgical Research at Baylor University Medical Center.

Dr. Johanna Bayer

Johanna Bayer, MD

Transplant surgeon on the medical staff at Baylor University Medical Center.

Dr. Anthony R. Gregg

Anthony R. Gregg, MD, MBA, FACOG, FACMG

Maternal Fetal Medicine specialist. Chief of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Chief of Maternal Fetal Medicine at Baylor University Medical Center.

Dr. John M. Putman

John M. Putman, MD

Reproductive endocrinology and infertility specialist on the medical staff at Baylor University Medical Center.

Dr. Ann Marie Warren

Ann Marie Warren, PhD, ABPP-Rp

Licensed clinical psychologist. Clinical Assistant Professor of the Department of Surgery at Texas A&M.

Kristin Posey Wallis, BSN, RNC

Kristin Posey Wallis, BSN, RNC

Nurse coordinator for uterus transplant at Baylor University Medical Center.

Heather Pirtle, BSN, RNC

Heather Pirtle, BSN, RNC

Nurse coordinator for uterus transplant at Baylor University Medical Center.

​​​​Publications and Research​

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